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Alumni Story

Alumni Stories: Maurissa Horwitz '98, Sony Pictures Animation Editor

An image of Ms. Horwitz created by a fellow animation artist. Maurissa Horwitz '98, associate editor for Sony Pictures animation, has spent the last 15 years building up her experience editing film in Los Angeles.  She entered the field as an apprentice, worked on some television projects, and now edits full-length animation films. Some recent titles she has worked on include "Over the Hedge" (2006), "Monsters vs Aliens" (2009), "How to Train Your Dragon" (2010), and "Gnomeo & Juliet" (2011).

Position: Associate editor  for Sony Pictures Animation

Please provide a two sentence description of what you do:

I edit animated feature films, which includes cutting together storyboards and editing the various stages of animation with dialogue, sound effects and music.

What is most satisfying about your current work?

Honestly, I find a lot of satisfaction just in having a small part of bringing a movie to life. The cherry on top is that, since I work mostly in animation, my projects are family-oriented and I can encourage absolutely everyone to see them.

What’s the best way to enter your field? Any essential elements of preparation?

A film major isn't necessary, but a serious interest in animation or film is required. Since there is so much film and animation equipment available to Dartmouth students with the gorgeous, new Black Family Visual Arts Center, I would recommend trying to get as much time in there as you can.

What advice would you give to others seeking opportunities in this field?

Being a great editor requires someone who is extremely detail oriented (one frame at a time), but who can also step back and see how the whole narrative is working. It takes time to cultivate those skills, so be prepared to spend quite a few years as an apprentice and assistant editor when you enter the industry. These are mostly organizational (not creative) roles, but what you learn from the various editors you work with and their management styles will be invaluable for a long career ahead.

Photo courtesy of Maurissa Horwitz.

How has Dartmouth supported you in your career development?

I have Dartmouth to thank for many reasons. First, the fact that a well-rounded liberal arts education is stressed at Dartmouth meant that when I decided to change from a chemistry major to film major in the middle of my junior year, it was easy and I was still able to graduate on time.  I had taken my time making that decision so I knew it was right for me.

Second, I found Dartmouth very challenging n every way. I really had to work my butt off for both good grades and to make personal connections with students and professors. If you want to tackle the entertainment business, you have to be a self-starter, work really hard and play very nice. The challenges of Dartmouth made me strong enough to be successful in this industry.

Lastly, the film studies department was incredibly supportive and encouraging, and having brilliant people who believe in you (which includes my parents) can make all the difference. My first internship came via an outdated listing at the career center; even though the program listed wasn't offered any more, I kept calling and harassing the company and spent my first summer in LA working on a low budget sci-fi movie thanks to them. The apprentice editor I met that summer has been my mentor for 15 years.

Alumni Stories: Matthew Megill '00, Missionary Physician in Niger

M.Megill_2

Matthew Megill ’00 is a missionary physician at a Christian hospital in Niger. His work focuses on HIV prevention and treatment. The hospital  employs 30 to 40 full time staffers and cares for about 300 outpatient and 100 inpatients daily.

Megill was a Classics major and involved in various Christian groups in his time at Dartmouth. He spent an off-term volunteering at a hospital in Jordan and taught middle school students at an English-speaking school in Cairo, Egypt following graduation. He received his medical degree from Temple University in 2005.

Position: HIV Program Director at Galmi hospital

Please provide a two sentence description of what you do:

I am a missionary physician serving at a Christian hospital in Niger. As HIV Program Director, I head HIV services, which covers screening, treatment, and outreach.

What is most satisfying about your current work?

I love to see our patients get better on ARVs (anti-retroviral medications). In 2012, we screened over 22,000 patients for HIV and follow about 600 on ARVs.

What’s the best way to enter your field? Any essential elements of preparation?

Medical school is pretty linear. Missions preparation involves quite a bit of concurrent screening and preparation as well.

What advice would you give to others seeking opportunities in this field?

Read widely and have a strong intellectual appetite.

How has Dartmouth supported you in your career development?

Dartmouth was a wonderful stepping stone.

Alumni Story: S. Caroline Kerr '05, CEO for Joyce Ivy Foundation

Courtesy of S. Caroline Kerr. S. Caroline Kerr ’05 is the Chief Executive Officer and founder of the Joyce Ivy Foundation, a non-profit organization that offers programs and scholarships to help young women from the Midwest attend college. At Dartmouth, Kerr majored in Sociology major modified with Women's and Gender Studies. She also earned a minor in Education. She was also a member of Palaeopitus senior society, competed on the women's crew team, and was Dartmouth Rainbow Alliance co-chair, among other activities.

Kerr is president of DGALA, Dartmouth's gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender alumni association. She has previously worked in Dartmouth's admissions office and recently completed a master's degree at Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Please provide a two sentence description of what you do.

I lead a non-profit organization that seeks to raise and broaden the college aspirations of talented female high schools students. The Joyce Ivy Foundation works with a variety of partner organizations across different sectors as we engage in our work.

What is most satisfying about your current work?

I believe in the mission of helping to connect talented youth with educational opportunities at highly selective colleges and universities (such as Dartmouth.) I enjoy the variety in my work: developing strategy, launching new initiatives, managing a team, and thinking creatively about how we contribute to the national landscape of college access.

What’s the best way to enter your field? Any essential elements of preparation?

The Joyce Ivy Foundation works specifically in the realm of college access, and I have previously worked in college admissions and college counseling. In an entrepreneurial setting, thinking creatively about partnerships and bringing an enthusiasm to relationships with potential partners, donors, and other supporters is invaluable.

What advice would you give to others seeking opportunities in this field?

Take advantage of volunteer or internship opportunities as a way to gain exposure to the field or work of interest, and use those opportunities to build your network.

How has Dartmouth supported you in your career development?

My undergraduate courses, jobs and internships, and involvement in student organizations prepared me to work effectively with a range of colleagues. I worked in the Undergraduate Admissions Office after college, and the work environment and mentoring I received prepared me well for graduate school and other professional roles. I have also been active in Dartmouth alumni leadership, such as the Alumni Council and affiliated groups, which has significantly contributed to my leadership development as well as provided me an opportunity to  stay engaged with Dartmouth.

Alumni Stories: Dan August, Financial Planner and Analyst for the NFL

Dan August with New York Giants' defensive tackle Rock Bernard at the XLVI Super Bowl Dan August '07 has worked for the past five years as a financial planner and analyst for the National Football League.  He previously worked as an investment banking analyst at Morgan Stanley.  At Dartmouth, August pursued a major in Economics and volunteered for DREAM.  He is currently working toward his Masters in Business Administration at the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School.

What is your position?

Financial planner and analyst for the National Football League

Please provide a two sentence description of what you do:

Manage financial processes for NFL businesses including budgeting, forecasting and business planning. I also assist with analysis for key strategic NFL initiatives.

What is most satisfying about your current work?

Working for a company that I am a fan of and that millions of others take an interest in.

What’s the best way to enter your field? Any essential elements of preparation?

Develop a strong skill set externally and keep an eye on the NFL career center. Depending upon what area we are hiring for, experience in sports is not necessarily a prerequisite.

What advice would you give to others seeking opportunities in this field?

Do not simply try to get your foot in the door, but rather look for positions that are good fits for your skill set. The NFL has a rotational program for students right out of college, but otherwise we generally hire people in specific fields or with sports backgrounds. Network with people in the field, ask smart questions, and check career centers if you are very interested.

How has Dartmouth supported you in your career development?

Dartmouth gave me the opportunity to get a great first job out of college (investment banking), which gave me the skills to join the NFL. Dartmouth's career center also helped me learn to be a better interviewee and make sure my resume was focusing on my strongest aspects.

Alumni Stories: Charlie Stoebe '08 on Entering the Media Industry

After graduating from Dartmouth in 2008 with a degree in Psychology, Charlie Stoebe immediately began a two-year Rotational Program at NBC Universal focused on digital media. Since completing the program, he's spent the past three years working in the sales and marketing side of NBC Sports. We asked him to tell us a little bit more about what it is like to work in Advertising and how to best enter the field: Position: Marketing Manager at NBC Universal (NBC Sports).

Two sentence description of what you do

Charlie Stoebe

The role of the Sales Marketing group is to generate revenue for NBC Sports through advertising. My specific role on the Marketing side is to come up with custom solutions for brands to execute on NBC Sports properties.

What is most satisfying about your current work?

I love how challenging and different each day is. On Monday I'll be thinking of how to convince McDonald's to spend money within Sunday Night Football, and then on Tuesday I'm working on an idea for Allstate within Premier League soccer. It's the benefit of working in a fast paced environment for a large company.

What’s the best way to enter your field? Any essential elements of preparation?

I think the best way is to get a job within a large media company. I started in a rotational program where I got to see different sides of the organization (News Publishing, Ad Sales, & Digital Products) before settling down into my current role. Obviously that is not available everywhere but any exposure within a large media company will help you learn about the different skills needed within each department.

What advice would you give to others seeking opportunities in this field?

I think the most important thing for Sales Marketing is writing. I have always loved writing - whether it be ridiculous emails to my fraternity or the infinite-page Psych papers each term. My job at its core is creative writing so having any background where writing is key will be extremely helpful.

How has Dartmouth supported you in your career development?

The NBC rotational program I started in came to campus for the Employer Connections Fair and that's how I got my start. Luckily for me the head of the program was a Dartmouth '97 and he was intent on having someone from Dartmouth get into the program - forever grateful to have been that someone.

Is there anything that we haven't asked you that you think we should?

The media industry is definitely underrepresented at most (if not all) career fairs, but don't let that fool you - there is a job for every passion and major. Check the careers section of the websites of all the major networks (NBC, CBS, ESPN, MTV, etc.) to see what's available. There are an infinite number of entry-level jobs at these companies so just because they don't come to campus does not mean they are not hiring.

Alumni Stories: Tom Schenck '89 on How to Break into Careers in Fundraising

Over the course of his career, Tom Schenck has worked in entertainment sales, served as a head of school, coached water polo and wrestling, and worked in Entertainment Marketing for Marvel -- where he also played Spiderman for fundraising events. We asked him to share information on his current work in fundraising and education. Position: Assistant Head of School for Advancement at Wasatch Academy.

Two sentence description of what you do:

Tom Schenck bow tie pic

I oversee the total landscape of marketing and fundraising to reach all development goals—from annual fund and planned giving to alumni relations and grants. I also work with major gifts  and money raising events.

1. What is most satisfying about your current work?

Connecting people with their passions to the right model of philanthropy, and achieving goals by being a life-long student.

2. What’s the best way to enter your field? Any essential elements of preparation?

Start by volunteering in a local charity...I founded my own foundation and worked in admissions. You should enjoy helping people and enjoy competition. Don't personalize rejection. You should have a diverse background of experiences. Be organized and be passionate about the cause you are promoting.

3. What advice would you give to others seeking opportunities in this field?

Call people at various charities and arrange an informational interview to see what they are looking for. Attend a conference of fundraisers. Do your online research.

4. How has Dartmouth supported you in your career development?

It has given me a sense of creating a big picture view of the world and its possibilities.

5. Is there anything that we haven't asked you that you think we should?

I am interested in talking with people who are interested in learning more about working in development or education...life is about giving back.

Intern for the Earl of Dartmouth (European Parliament)!

Fall intern sought for the Office of William Dartmouth, Member of European Parliament.Europe Day - European Parliament Description of work:    The internship offers a chance to experience the day to day operation of an MEP's office in the European Parliament, from experience in EU legislation, the work of the European Parliament to drafting speeches and press releases.  An important task will be research particularly relating to the International Trade Committee of which William (The Earl of) Dartmouth is a Member and also the Coordinator for his political Group. There will also be some work related to the Foreign Affairs Committee of which William is a substitute.

Successful applicants will have proven research, IT and organisational skills. Knowledge of French would be helpful but it is not essential.  Applicants must be in possession of a valid permit to stay in the European Union for the duration of the traineeship if they are not citizens of the EU.

Place of work:  European Parliament in Brussels and Strasbourg

Duration of internship:  3 months (possibly prolongation of internship)

Start date:  On or around September 3rd, 2013.

Note:  William Dartmouth is a direct descendant of the Second Earl of Dartmouth, for whom Dartmouth College is named.

Stipend:  Approximately 1,200 euros/month

Deadline:  June 10th, 2013

Application instructions:  Email cover letter and resume to:  william.dartmouth@europarl.europa.eu

Kevin Karp ( EX DARTMOUTH ) Intern for William Dartmouth September 2012 to May 2013 writes

"My traineeship under William Dartmouth at the European Parliament involves senior-staff responsibility and requires succinct exposition of EU policies.  In scope and competence demanded, it is a professional-grade position.  Specifically, I serve as an adviser to Mr. Dartmouth in his work for the Committee on International Trade, or INTA.  Because INTA is arguably the European Parliament's most powerful committee, and because trade is such an important factor in foreign relations, my work in this particular area has made me into a poised observer of global politics.  In my advisory work I have analyzed draft opinions on European Commission regulations before the Committee, helped determine Mr. Dartmouth's votes on amendments to those opinions, authored questions to the Commission for written answer, drafted responses to press articles, and written and edited speeches that Mr. Dartmouth has delivered in Strasbourg and the UK.   One of these speeches was Mr. Dartmouth's address to the 2013 UKIP Spring Conference in Exeter, dealing with the different trade relationships with the EU that exist outside of membership.  I have been turning this speech into a pamphlet that will serve as a template for further research.

Alongside the advisory work for Mr. Dartmouth, I also write policy briefs for Michael McManus, a staff researcher and member of UKIP at the European Parliament.  These briefs cover a wide range of topics in foreign policy and economic issues.  Mr. McManus keeps these briefs on file and provides them on request to UKIP MEPs who need information on such topics before giving speeches or talking to the media."

DEADLINE TO APPLY:  June 10th, 2013 for Fall Term

Note:  This information was received by the Dartmouth College Career Services Office for promotional purposes and was uploaded with formatting edits only.

 

Alumni Stories: Noel Danforth '85 on Working as an Independent Graphic Designer

Position: Principal, Gold Star Studios/Independent Graphic Design Professional 
Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts
Description of what you do: I am a graphic designer. I use visual communication (design) skills to design and develop a broad range of materials for my clients. You can see some of my work on my website: www.goldstarstudios.com
Major at Dartmouth: French
What is most satisfying about your current work? 
Being fulfilled by what I do each day. Design exposes you to so many of life's currents and allows you to use your intuition to explore.  I have variously fallen in love with different aspects of my design practice: form, color, typography, layout, my tools and my current obsession—my camera. I've been exploring the idea of seeing and perspective through the camera lens.  
The beauty of a career in design is that there are so many possibilities and if you like learning (most liberal arts students do) it's a great field as it is continues to evolve and there are always new things to learn. When I started my career in graphic design the computer was a relatively new tool for designers; with the computer and of course the web, many new areas of design practice have been born. 
What’s the best way to enter your field? Any essential elements of preparation? 
There are various ways to obtain the background you need to be a designer and it's a multifaceted field with many specializations. My advice is to research what type of design you'd ultimately like to practice and to have that information direct your educational path. Pick a school and culture that aligns with your goals. The traditional path is to attend a BFA or MFA program. Ultimately an MFA is the best route if you'd like to teach design. 
When I started looking into a career in design, I was initially disheartened as it seemed the best approach was a BFA and that I had, in a sense, "missed the boat" and an MFA seemed beyond my reach not having any background in design nor a portfolio. After researching the possibilities open to me and considering school locations, finances and work prospects I decided to take a less traditional path. I attended the Massachusetts College of Art and Design's graphic design certificate program, an evening program, and gained work experience by day. Before entering the program I took design courses to see if pursuing design studies was something I really wanted, and I was able to build a portfolio to gain entrance. A portfolio allows potential employers/design schools to assess your design skills.  It is a reflection of you and your work, and a good portfolio is a necessity when you start looking for work or are seeking to gain admission to a design program.
What advice would you give to others seeking opportunities in graphic design?
For exploring the field I recommend taking courses in design at an art college. This will expose you to the design skills you need to develop, the culture of art schools, and allow you to start building a portfolio. Once you have developed a portfolio you can apply to a design program and/or start looking for work. Personally I found attending an evening program and gaining work experience simultaneously to be very rewarding; I was able to immediately put my new skills into practice. Design is about practice, the more you do the better you get.
Can you tell us about your experiences in different work environments as a graphic designer? Which has been your favorite?
I have worked in-house for educational institutions, financial services companies, a medium-sized design firm, and an in-house advertising agency. I enjoyed all these experiences to different degrees and I learned something from each environment. One distinction often made in the design world is working in-house as opposed to working independently or as a freelancer. All have their advantages; for me it comes down to personal preference and that can change over the course of your career. Having this varied background is what allowed me to start my own practice. It enabled me to broaden the scope of my portfolio and develop a network for future work opportunities. Running my own small practice suits me now and is my current favorite.
How would you recommend students who are interested in freelancing get into the field?
A freelance design career is something that develops over time and doing good work is the best marketing tool. If your work is good, clients will become repeat customers and new clients will seek you out. To start out you must be armed with a strong portfolio then you can either introduce yourself to prospective clients/employers or seek out an agency that specializes in connecting employers with temporary design help. This latter approach is an excellent way to see different work environments and to explore what type of work you might enjoy as a practice long-term. 
What do you do to keep your practice/perspective fresh and evolving?
I enjoy experimenting in different media; this gets me away from my computer and allows me to access different thought pathways for problem solving. I believe design is about keeping open and developing a keen eye. Also, I find it important to remind myself in a more tactile way why I love what I do. Picking up another media and working with color, shape and texture in an intuitive way helps me to connect to less directed problem-solving. Whether it's drawing, painting, sewing, or beading, I love to work in a way that allows more freedom for my intuition to connect with an unconscious flow. We all carry ideas around that sometimes need a little coaxing into the light.
How has Dartmouth supported you in your career development?
Dartmouth's dedication to undergraduate liberal arts is legend, the broad spectrum and depth of course offerings allows students many lens on the world. Design is a big picture field, it's everywhere and in everything, the more of the world you understand the better you will be at your practice. Though my design skills are essential to my practice the underlying skills are from the liberal arts: having a broad knowledge-base from sciences to languages, the ability to problem solve and communicate clearly, having curiosity and discipline, and a love of learning. Dartmouth serves these up in spades.

Soralee Ayvar '07 - Operations Director for Art Studio Miami

Soralee Ayvar is the Operations Director of Art Studio Inc.,

Art Studio Miami is an Non-Profit Organization (NPO) with the mission of empowering young minds through creative-holistic arts integration  by providing a safe location where youth are inspired and guided by artists, teachers, professionals and mentors who support the student's education and career development through the integration of creative holistic arts. Soralee joined Art Studio as a volunteer in 2009 and became Operations Director in 2010 with 15+ years of experience in youth development, volunteer management, training and life skills.

After studying music in middle school and theater (with a specialty in Mime and Costume/Makeup Design) in high school, Soralee received her B.A in Sociology from Dartmouth College and an M.S. in Business Leadership from Nova Southeastern University. Soralee's current role continues her long-time personal vision to empower the next generation of leaders with the creative tools, knowledge and motivation to innovate and create positive change for themselves and their local and global community. (Bio kindly provided by Ms. Ayvar)

~

Soralee Ayvar
Operations Director
Art Studio Miami
www.ArtStudioMiami.org

Empowering Young Minds | Healing Systemic Poverty

Soralee joined us via Skype on Tues, April 9, 2013.  Please check back for an audio recording of the session.

CAREER CONVERSATION with Soralee Ayvar '07 - TUES @ 12:15 PM

Soralee Ayvar is the Operations Director of Art Studio Inc.,

Art Studio Miami is an Non-Profit Organization (NPO) with the mission of empowering young minds through creative-holistic arts integration  by providing a safe location where youth are inspired and guided by artists, teachers, professionals and mentors who support the student's education and career development through the integration of creative holistic arts. Soralee joined Art Studio as a volunteer in 2009 and became Operations Director in 2010 with 15+ years of experience in youth development, volunteer management, training and life skills.

After studying music in middle school and theater (with a specialty in Mime and Costume/Makeup Design) in high school, Soralee received her B.A in Sociology from Dartmouth College and an M.S. in Business Leadership from Nova Southeastern University. Soralee's current role continues her long-time personal vision to empower the next generation of leaders with the creative tools, knowledge and motivation to innovate and create positive change for themselves and their local and global community. (Bio kindly provided by Ms. Ayvar)

~

Soralee Ayvar
Operations Director
Art Studio Miami
www.ArtStudioMiami.org

Empowering Young Minds | Healing Systemic Poverty

Five tips from former Wall Street Journal reporter Joe Mathewson ’55 for students interested in journalism

“I’ve never met a bored journalist,” Medill School of Journalism professor and former Wall Street Picture of Joe Mathewson courtesy of 123People.comJournal reporter Joe Mathewson ’55 often tells students, noting that there are “no dull jobs and no dull days” in the field of journalism. While some people like to claim that journalism is a dying field, Mathewson rightly believes that it is simply evolving, and he wants students to know that journalism needs talented graduates with a passion for writing and a strong liberal arts background. With a number of grandchildren at the College, Mathewson is a regular visitor to Career Services and a mentor to students currently considering a career in journalism. Here, we’ve compiled Mathewson’s top five tips for students who have a passion for the written word and investigating the world around them.

  1. Journalism needs intellectually curious young graduates from a variety of academic backgrounds — sell your experience, no matter what it is! Whether you are a history or neuroscience or economics major, journalism needs you.
  2. Have a blog and credentials you can show people. Nothing speaks to your skills better than a thorough, well-organized set of clips. Make sure you can speak to why your previous experience, regardless of its direct relation to journalism, will help you succeed as a journalist.
  3. Don’t confine yourself to print. In this day and age, you need to have multiple skills — learn to shoot and edit video, take photographs, blog and manage social media. Wire services in particular are booming.
  4. Learn how to write about economics. The economy is the number one story around the world right now, and you will be a highly marketable employee if you know how to write about business, employment and interest rates.
  5. Familiarize yourself with the tricks of the trade — AP style, interview skills, journalistic ethics, etc. Do research for specific job and internship opportunities. If you’re applying for a job with the Associated Press, Bloomberg or Reuters, learn the verbs of attribution in business journalism.

Interested in pursuing job or internship opportunities in journalism? Make sure you’ve signed up on Dartboard to receive our regular blitzes about communications jobs! There are stories out there waiting to be told — are you going to be the one to tell them?

Alumni Conversations: Charles Li, Manager of Mobile Strategy at EF Education First (Part 1)

EF Education First, commonly referred to as EF, is a leading private education company, offering “every imaginable way to learn a language, travel abroad, experience another culture, or earn an academic degree.” EF recruits at Dartmouth for the EF360 Global Management Trainee program, a hands-on program that provides one-on-one mentoring with senior leaders, the opportunity to learn the company’s unique entrepreneurial style, and the chance to oversee a major project central to EF’s business.

We sat down with economics major Charles Li ’12, an EF360 Global Management Trainee, to learn about his work and get advice on best practices to prepare for this type of unconventional management track program.

1. Tell me about the EF360 program.

For the 360 global management training program, you work with a senior executive who serves as your mentor and guide, and you begin by rotating through departments such as sales, marketing, finance and operations.   Trainees then work with their mentors to identify a challenging project or projects to lead which will have a tangible impact on EF’s business, and you spend the remainder of your first year as a 360 implementing those projects.

2. Describe your job.

Everyone’s career path is unique. I’m fascinated by mobile technology and did a great team project on mobile application development while at Dartmouth. I now work as a Manager of Mobile Strategy, and my 360 project within EF is focused on recruiting mobile developers and other “digital natives” to help drive our mobile business objectives.

Many management training programs at other corporations hire a large number of people to work in specific positions and weed out based on performance. The EF360 program works in reverse.  They hire a small number of people, identify their strengths, and groom them to fit a position that capitalizes on their interests and the company’s needs. Because we travel to each of EF’s global headquarters for training, we have an opportunity to work closely with a small group of management trainees who share a passion for education and the company cause. Yet at the same time, each EF360 is working on his or her own unique project.

3. What’s most surprised you about the position?

The level of responsibility. After four months, I am already hiring a team. I’m grateful for the responsibility.  It demonstrates a level of trust that EF has in its recruits, and that trust naturally supports creativity and collaboration both within teams and across product lines. 

4. Is it necessary to have advanced coursework in Economics, Education, or any particular subject area to join the EF360 program?

Absolutely not. We don’t hire skills, we hire people. We recruit at Dartmouth because graduates have the leadership skills, problem solving ability, and a can-do attitude.  The recruiters here would rather find someone with a passion for education, travel, and learning languages, and the ability to problem solve, than someone who is an expert at one skill and only one skill.

5. EF is known for having a really unique interviewing process? Can you describe this, and share a few tips on how to best prepare?

EF is looking for creative thinkers. I was asked “what is the best business to create using the items in this hypothetical box?”  I created a business plan.

Once you make the interview round, you begin a series of meetings with key leaders across EF business units.  You do not receive a schedule of meetings before you arrive at EF.  The first few interviews focus on identifying your strengths and specific areas of interest.  Then you meet with executives within several specific products with whom they think you will have the greatest synergy.

The best advice I have is to simply be yourself.  Hopefully you’ll bring a love of learning and a passion for education and travel to the interview too.